Megan

Megan's story

Music is a big part of Megan's life and because she has Rett Syndrome it is one of the main ways that she communicates with those around her. During music therapy classes she has learnt that by hitting something or banging a drum she can let others know that she would like more of what she is listening to.




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Rett Syndrome is a rare condition that affects the development of the brain and causes severe physical and mental disability that begins in early childhood.

Since 2012 Megan has lived at The Children's Trust in Tadworth, and attends The Children's Trust School where music therapy is a key part of the curriculum. Her Grandmother Lynda explains:

"When she lived with us I would take Megan to the theatre to see musicals at every opportunity and I still do whenever she comes home for a few days. She just loves it; it brings a tear to my eye to watch her face light up. So music has been a key part of her life since she was young, but now it is even more important as it allows her to be more vocal and communicate."

"Megan will respond extremely well with one to one attention and she has an incredibly infectious giggle. It really is so lovely to hear Megan make sounds, as it is her way of talking to us."

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Ethan and mum

Ethan's story

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